Monthly Archives: February 2013

Lisa Zunshine is Bush-Holbrook Professor of English at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, where she teaches courses in Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature and culture. She is the author or editor of eleven books, including Why We Read Fiction: Theory of … Continue reading

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Applying Harvey’s Elements

In Gordon Harvey’s Gordon Harvey’s “Elements of the Academic Essay,” he names and defines thirteen elements common to nonfiction writing. For Tuesday’s class, read Harvey’s definitions of these elements. Then, take a look at your assigned element below and think about … Continue reading

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Styles of Narration

Any English major is familiar with the basic styles of narration: 1st-person, 3rd-person omniscient, 3rd-person limited, 2nd-person (not used a lot). In Mrs. Dalloway, Woolf achieves her stream of consciousness effect through a third-person narrator, but she moves freely between … Continue reading

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Omnibus

If you were wondering what those omnibusses bustling around London in Mrs. Dalloway would have looked like, here you go. This is a 1923 specimen of the London General Omnibus Company.

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Close Reading (and Annotation)

Students at the Eberly Writing Center at Dickinson College have created this YouTube video on techniques for close reading (and, implicitly, annotation). Take a look.

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Clarissa Dalloway Walks

Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941) conceived Mrs. Dalloway as an experiment in writing “party consciousness”–the thoughts, feelings, and sensation of people in an intensified social situation. As she wrote, she expanded that idea. You might say the novel portrays consciousness in … Continue reading

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Woolf’s Atoms

In Lodge’s Thinks…, Helen Reed quotes Virginia Woolf’s essay “Modern Novels” (published in the Times Literary Supplement in 1919): “Let us record the atoms as they fall upon the mind in the order in which they fall.” I thought I’d share … Continue reading

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Annotating a Passage

To “annotate” means to make notes or comments on a text or document. It’s a good idea to get in a habit of doing this regularly with texts we read for this course–particularly if you’re going to write about them. … Continue reading

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Writing Groups

Over the course of the semester, you’ll work in writing groups–exchanging work and offering each other feedback. We’ll start the writing groups off with the annotated passages you’ll do over the next couple of weeks. We may decide to shake … Continue reading

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Reading Questions

We talked about these questions in class last week. It’s a good idea to keep them in mind as you read for this course (or any course). They’ll help you get a handle on the motives of the writers–and help … Continue reading

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